This year for the 20th Japanese Film Festival, we are excited to unveil a range of dramas with a difference: featuring sophisticated plots, challenging issues, and brilliant acting and direction. Watch A Bride for Rip Van Winkle for poetic visuals and complex character studies, The Sun for a refreshing film tackling social issues, and Everest for a beautifully shot human drama.

 

Header image from THE SUN © 2016 “Taiyo” Film Partners

 

A Bride for Rip Van Winkle (リップヴァンウィンクルの花嫁)
DRAMA
A Bride for Rip Van Winkle plays out like a beautiful dream sequence, reflecting life in all its beauty and despair. The cast’s powerful performances and the director Shunji Iwai’s masterful storytelling draw out the complexities of personas, social expectations, and relationships.
A Bride for Rip Van Winkle (リップヴァンウィンクルの花嫁)
DRAMA
Director Isao Yukisada (Crying Out Love in the Center of the World) takes a standard fame-and-jealousy drama and creates an arthouse film brimming with mystery instead. Just when you thought you’ve predicted the story, Pink and Gray strays from movie formulae and turns everything on its head with a clever twist. With charismatic performances by newcomer Yuto Nakajima (Hey! Say! JUMP!) and Masaki Suda (The Light Shines Only There, Princess Jellyfish).
The Sun (太陽)
DRAMA
The Sun, a post-apocalyptic drama exploring the tensions and inhibitions of a society at breaking point; featuring a talented cast led by actor Ryunosuke Kamiki (BAKUMAN。, Your Name). While tackling social issues through film was common in fifties and sixties Japanese cinema, recent movie trends favouring crowd-pleasing entertainment makes The Sun a fresh, stand-out film.
Everest –The Summit of the Gods– (エヴェレスト 神々の山嶺)
DRAMA
Destiny, desire, and nature take centre-stage in this stunning film shot on location in Nepal. Everest –The Summit of the Gods– is an awe-inspiring reminder of the harsh, cruel beauty of nature. It is based on Baku Yumemakura’s international best-selling novel by the same name and stars Hiroshi Abe (After the Storm) and Junichi Okada (Library Wars).

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